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Sunday, May 22, 2016

TODAY AT METRON - 5/22/16

“...Bish you have a bug in my home and car... The word was for me.”
-BJB
"It was EXACTLY what I needed! I'm so happy that spirit bug is working SO VERY Well!…
- PLC
"Wow! what a powerful service...You have everything you already need...Goose bumps!!! Always good having Jonah in the house...love his groove & the song I am Blessed...I think sometimes we take for granted how blessed we really are...I do believe that God puts people (you) into our life to speak over you....You believed in us & called us out to do things we would never have done. You have always been a father figure to me spiritually...Thank You!!! I try to live by one thing in life...Do you want to be happy or do you want to be right...I choose to be Happy! Love & Blessings”
- DPM
"You better preach it Bishop! Jim Swilley"
- KS
"Thank you Jonah Swilley for sharing your Awesome Talent today! You blessed us ALL!!!"
-PLC

"He was amazing today! Beautiful spirit
- DPM

“...Great Word this morning Bishop!
- RM
"...Loved hearing Ken speak today... He needs to do it more often"
- DPM
"Aloha, Bishop Jim! This morning you virtually summed up my three-part series, which I facilitated over the last three months of our Men's Fellowship. That is, coming to peace with one another in spite of our nuances, especially with regard to personal theology. You alluded to the fallout of that between Paul and Barnabas, as recorded in the book of Acts. In my last part, which I covered earlier this month, I also brought to light the confrontation between Paul and Peter, as illustrated in the book of Galatians (ch. 2). It appears that Peter made mends with Paul, as illustrated in his second epistle (ch. 3). Peter apparently wrote his second epistle - and likely his first, as well - while in Rome, well after Paul's arrival by virtue of his own request to be transferred as a detainee to Rome. While there is no clear evidence that Paul and Barnabas ever reconciled or made peace with one another, Paul does mention Barnabas in a letter to the church at Colossus (4:10) as a reference to John Mark, at this point, now, a companion of Paul's. Perceivably, under a good light. In a more subtle tone is the ongoing feud between James and Paul. To which point, I'm inclined to think, there was no reconciliation or peace made between these two men. There are many things that stand out to me in these conflicts (unresolved issues), but primarily two (2) things: 1) the introduction of Timothy, a very young and perceivably meek and timid young man, immediately after Paul's fallout with Barnabas over John Mark, a timid young man, and 2) the very subtle change in theology of Peter and John, well after James's passing around 62 CE. I firmly believe that James's death allowed John and Peter to rethink their theology in the ensuing years, to the point that John even fashions his Gospel to reflect a similar theology to that of Paul's. I do not believe that John could have written his epistle under the hospice of James, because of the perceived backlash that may have resulted from the disparity of their theologies. I think, too, that Paul's growth in followers was perceived as a threat to James's ministry. But, as much as James's letter reflects his brother's (Jesus) teachings, there is one vital component of Jesus's teaching that James apparently does not reflect upon: "Peace I leave with you; My peace I give to you" (Jn. 14:27). In other words, I declare peace between us, but I also want you to share in the peace I experience as a result of this mutual feeling.
- KZ

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